UNITED NATIONS — North Korea‘s top diplomat said President Trump’s tweet that leader Kim Jong Un “won’t be around much longer” was a declaration of war against his country by the United States.

“This is clearly a declaration of war,” Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho said through a translator in New York Monday. “… The U.N. charter stipulates individual member states’ rights to self-defense. Since the United States declared war on our country, we will have every right to make countermeasures, including the right to shoot down the United States’ strategic bombers even when they’re not yet inside the airspace border of our country.”

Ri referred to Mr. Trump’s tweet Saturday night that said: “Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won’t be around much longer!”

Ri said: “The question of who won’t be around much longer will be answered then.”

Mr. Trump’s tweets have sparked or stoked several controversies during the first year of his presidency, including his recent criticism of NFL players who kneel during the national anthem as a form of protest.

Even some of the president’s supporters aren’t fans of how he uses Twitter, as one told “60 Minutes” special contributing correspondent Oprah Winfrey in a roundtable discussion broadcast Sunday night.

“I still don’t like his attacks, his Twitter attacks, if you will, on other politicians,” a man named Tom said. “I don’t think that’s appropriate. But, at the same time, his actions speak louder than words. And I love what he’s doing to this country. Love it.”

North Korea has been trying to convince other governments to condemn Mr. Trump for vowing to “totally destroy” the country in his speech to the United Nations, CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy reports.

In a letter sent to foreign parliaments, North Korea called Mr. Trump’s threat an “intolerable insult,” North Korean state media reported, and the country’s foreign minister had said Mr. Trump’s words made North Korea’s “rocket’s visit to the U.S. mainland inevitable all the more.”

It was not immediately clear which governments had been sent the letter, Tracy says, but it was part of what appeared to be a new approach of trying to turn Mr. Trump’s threats to destroy North Korea against him.

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