• Magnitude 5.7 earthquake struck in Japan ahead of the Typhoon Hagibis making landfall on Honshu island
  • Heavy downpours and strong winds pounded the capital as the typhoon hit the south coast today
  • Around 7.3 million people have been told to evacuate as two were killed and more than 30 were injured
  • Japan Meteorological Agency said to ‘take all measures necessary to save lives’ and more rain is forecast
  • More than 180,000 people are without power and 20 inches of rain is forecast for Tokyo area in next 24 hours

Huge waves crash against the shore in Mihana, Japan as Typhoon Hagibis gathers speed on the south coast of Honshu island

Seven million people have been told to evacuate in Japan as a typhoon forecast to be the nation’s most powerful in six decades made landfall on Honshu island.

Around 7.3 million people were placed under non-compulsory evacuation orders and more than 30 were injured after Typhoon Hagibis hit the south coast on Saturday.

Even before making landfall, Hagibis caused enormous disruption, forcing the cancellation of two Rugby World Cup matches, delaying the Japanese Grand Prix and grounding all flights in the Tokyo region.

It crashed into Japan’s main Honshu island at 7pm before barrelling into Izu, a peninsula southwest of Tokyo, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

‘Be ready for rainfall of the kind that you have never experienced,’ said meteorological agency official Yasushi Kajihara, adding that areas usually safe from disasters may prove vulnerable.

‘Take all measures necessary to save your life,’ he said.

Huge waves crash against the shore in Mihana, Japan as Typhoon Hagibis gathers speed on the south coast of Honshu island

The storm claimed the first of two victims hours before arriving on the coast, when strong winds from its outer bands flipped a car in Chiba east of Tokyo and killed the driver.

But it was Hagibis’ torrential rain that prompted the JMA to issue its highest-level emergency warning for parts of Tokyo and the surrounding areas, warning of disaster.

‘Unprecedented heavy rain has been seen in cities, towns and villages for which the emergency warning was issued,’ JMA forecaster Yasushi Kajiwara said.

‘The possibility is extremely high that disasters such as landslides and floods have already occurred. It is important to take action that can help save your lives.’

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